“A rose by any other name…”

In my last post, “It seems the sky is falling…”, I talked about the Russian meteor event and flyby of asteroid 2012 DA14, both of which occurred on Friday, February 15, 2013. In that post I talked a lot about the various terms of things in space that can enter the Earth’s atmosphere and ultimately cause an “impact”. But there are a lot of terms and some of them have very minute differences, so I figured I’d devote a post just to explaining these terms. Specifically, I’d like to look at a few differences.

“Meteoroid” vs. “Meteor” vs. “Meteorite”

These words all share the same root, the Greek word meteōros, meaning “suspended in the air”, and look very similar, but they do mean different things. To start off, let’s think of a small piece of rock in space. We don’t care what kind of rock it is or where it comes from, let’s just call it a small rock. Now, let’s say that small rock is happily zipping around the solar system, obeying the law of gravity as it orbits the Sun, when suddenly it gets too close to Earth and the gravitational pull of the planet sends tugs it out of its original orbit and towards our planet. Now, that small piece of rock that’s on it’s way into the Earth’s atmosphere, that’s a “meteoroid”. Once that “meteoroid” hits the Earth’s atmosphere travelling at high speed it’s going to heat up and leave a trail in the sky. That heating up and the resulting streak in the sky is a “meteor”- commonly referred as a “shooting star”. If you get a whole bunch of associated “meteoroids”, say a whole bunch of little pieces of rock left over from an asteroid or comet that passed by, that enter the atmosphere at the same time, creating meteors, that’s called a “meteor shower”. So, the “meteoroid” is the small rock that causes streak of light and the “meteor” is the actual visible streak we see. Now as that “meteoroid” is hurtling through the atmosphere and heating up, it can literally blow up. That huge flash that’s caused by the disintegration of the “meteoroid” is known as a “fireball” and really bright “fireballs” are known as “bolides”. That huge flash of light is usually associated with a large deposit of energy into the atmosphere that causes a pressure wave like to ones seen in Tunguska and Chelyabinsk.

A meteor or “shooting star” streaking across the sky is really a piece of debris burning up in the atmosphere. Credit: Wikipedia

The solar system is full of little pieces of debris moving really fast and without the atmosphere that debris would constantly be pummeling the surface of the planet…and us. So the atmosphere protects us. Things are constantly entering the atmosphere and burning up, creating “meteors”. Most of these “meteoroids” are about the size of a pebble- much to small to reach the Earth’s surface. But it does happen occasionally. When large objects enter the atmosphere and make it down to Earth, that remaining piece of rock that reaches the ground is known as a “meteorite”. So yeah, if you’re one your way to work in the morning and see that there’s a huge piece of rock sitting on your car, that’s probably a “meteorite”…or there’s someone who really doesn’t like you. Don’t worry though, as Bad Astronomer Phil Plait writes, only one person has ever been hit by a meteorite and that occurred in Alabama in 1954.

This Canyon Diablo meteorite was part of the 50-meter asteroid that formed the mile-wide Meteor Crater in Arizona. Credit: Wikipedia

Now, not all “meteors” and “meteorites” are caused by natural objects in space. Think about all of the satellites and “space junk” orbiting the Earth. If any of that space junk were to re-enter the atmosphere it would burn up, just like a space rock, and cause a meteor. And another, less appealing example is astronaut waste. On the now-retired Space Shuttles, the urine was expelled out into the upper atmosphere to burn up/evaporate– this actually created a visible glow. Solid waste on the Space Shuttles was collected and removed once the Shuttle returned to the ground, unfortunately that’s not really an option on the International Space Station (ISS), where astronaut waste is stored, then loaded into a disposable space probe and ejected out to burn up in the atmosphere. So yeah, next time you wish on a shooting star, just think that it might actually be astronaut poop.

“Comet” vs. “Asteroid”

Okay so now we’ve talked about the differences between the things that enter the atmosphere. But beyond man-made sources, where do those “meteoroids” come from? Many of them are from rocky, metallic objects in the solar system known as “asteroids”. What are asteroids? According to NASA:

“Most asteroids are made of rock, but some are composed of metal, mostly nickel and iron. They range in size from small boulders to objects that are hundreds of miles in diameter. A small portion of the asteroid population may be burned-out comets whose ices have evaporated away and been blown off into space. Almost all asteroids are part of the Main Asteroid Belt, with orbits in the vast region of space between Mars and Jupiter.”

Most asteroids are actually leftover bits and pieces of planets that weren’t able to coalesce under gravity. As the NASA page describes, most asteroids live in the Asteroid Belt that orbits between Mars and Jupiter. However, as those asteroids travel around the Sun, they can bump into each other, causing a rogue asteroid to leave the Asteroid Belt and traverse the solar system. Sometimes those asteroids fall into the Sun, sometimes they collide with Earth or other planets.

Vesta, one of the largest asteroids in the solar system, was recently studied by NASA’s Dawn mission. Dawn was the first spacecraft ever to go into orbit around an asteroid. Credit: Wikipedia

So what’s the difference between an asteroid and a comet? A “comet” is an icy body that lives out in the farthest regions of the solar system. There is belief by scientists that many comets primarily live in a region at the edge of the solar system known as the Oort Cloud. As these icy bodies come into the inner solar system and approach the Sun, they increase in brightness as the heat from the Sun causes the ice to melt and reflect sunlight. Comets are generally much easier to view than asteroids due to the high reflectivity of the water vapor it releases as they travel through the inner solar system. Generally comets that pass by the orbit of the Earth leave a debris trail in their wake. When the Earth’s orbit takes it through one of those debris trails, it causes a meteor shower.

Comet West made a spectacular show for skywatchers in March 1976. This image shows a great example of the two types of tails that comets often have. One tail is caused by water vapor coming off from sunlight and the other is ionization caused by the solar wind of particles streaming off of the Sun. Credit: APOD/NASA

So comets are mostly icy bodies that live out at the very edge of the solar system and asteroids are rocky, metallic bodies that generally live in the Asteroid Belt in the region between Mars and Jupiter.

So what did we learn?

So let’s review in this handy table made by the great folks at NASA’s Near-Earth Object Program:

Asteroid A relatively small, inactive, rocky body orbiting the Sun.
Comet A relatively small, at times active, object whose ices can vaporize in sunlight forming an atmosphere (coma) of dust and gas and, sometimes, a tail of dust and/or gas.
Meteoroid A small particle from a comet or asteroid orbiting the Sun.
Meteor The light phenomena which results when a meteoroid enters the Earth’s atmosphere and vaporizes; a shooting star.
Meteorite A meteoroid that survives its passage through the Earth’s atmosphere and lands upon the Earth’s surface.

The world will not end today…

Okay, this is really getting pretty infuriating. I have friends, family, and strangers messaging me about when the planets will align tomorrow.

So let’s set the record straight…or at least as much as we can by answering a few simple questions regarding this Mayan end-of-the-world who-hah and why the world will NOT end today.

Where did this idea of the world ending even come from?

The ancient Maya civilization (aka the Mayans), that lived in Central America from roughly 1800 BC until the Spanish wiped the last of them out around 1700 AD were great astronomers. They had their own constellations, pre-telescopic knowledge of the Orion Nebula as a fuzzy object in the sky, and some of their sites are oriented to astronomical objects such as the Pleiades star cluster. Like many advanced cultures, the Mayans used a calendar. They didn’t invent the calendar, but they used it, like most Central American civilizations previous to Columbus coming to the New World; however, they did add on to it.

A view of a Mayan calendar wheel. Credit: www.epicpodquest.com

The Maya came up with a very different calendar from what we use. They have what we call “the Long Count”, which is made up of 13 “baktun”. Each “baktun” is comprised of 20 “katun”. Each “katun” is 20 “tun”, each “tun” is 18 “unial”, and each “unial” is 20 “kin”. What the heck does that mean? Well, we can easily make the metaphor that the Mayan “Long Cycle” is like a year in our very own modern day Gregorian calendar. Now, a “kin” to the Maya is equivalent to a modern day, so a Long Cycle is MUCH longer than a Gregorian year- it’s actually roughly 5,125 years. But here I’m using the analogy just to make a point.

Mayan: 1 Long Cycle = 13 baktun = 260 katun = 5,200 tun = 93,600 unial = 1,872,000 kin

Gregorian: 1 millennium = 10 centuries = 100 decades = 1,000 years = 12,000 months = 365,250 days

When you get a Gregorian calendar for your desk or wall, it usually only has a single year in it, for instance, your current calendar probably doesn’t extend into 2013. Of course that doesn’t mean that 2013 doesn’t exist, you just need a new calendar. Well, the same thing happened with the Maya, they stopped generating calendars beyond this current baktun, which would end in our modern Gregorian time at December 21, 2012 at 11:11 GMT. But like I said, this doesn’t mean the world is going to end. It’s this “reset” of the Mayan calendar that has fueled the plethora of end-of-the-world scenarios.

Looking at this another way, imagine if there WAS a cataclysmic end of the world tomorrow and then far in the future an advanced civilization found what was left our world and realized that there were no calendars that existed beyond 2013…what might they conclude? Oh no, the human calendar must have ended after January 31, 2013!? We all know that’s not true, but one could imagine how an ignorant futuristic civilization might be confused.

Based on this “end of the Mayan calendar”, people across the world and across the internet have tried to come up with ways and reasons that the world might end on December 21, 2012. Some of these catastrophes are minutely based on real things, many are not, and almost all of them are ridiculous. On top of that, the movie 2012 didn’t help the commotion.

What is a planetary alignment and is there going to be one?

A planetary alignment, or conjunction, is when planets appear to lineup in the sky from Earth and they occur fairly frequently. There are a lot of hoaxes related to the alignment of the planets and how that will impact Earth. There’s also another idea that the Earth and Sun will align with the center of the Milky Way galaxy and something cataclysmic will happen to destroy the Earth. This isn’t going to happen. Here’s an article by Francis Reddy of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center that explains why an alignment with the galactic center won’t mean the end of days. So no, don’t try to go outside and look for an alignment of planets in the sky, you won’t see anything.

Now, there was some more baloney going around the internet about a planetary alignment over the pyramids at Giza on December 3, 2012. That was also a hoax… aka NOT REAL!

This photo of a supposed December 3 planetary alignment of the pyramids quickly made the rounds all over the internet. Too bad it’s not real. Credit: Bad Astronomy

Is a rogue planet or asteroid going to crash into the Earth?

NO! Of course not! NASA has a whole division of scientists, in the Near-Earth Object Program, who work to identify and track objects that could pose potential danger to Earth. So far, they have no indication that anything will impact the Earth. There are stories of a rogue world called “Nibiru” that is supposedly going to crash into the Earth. This false claim of a rogue planet-destroyer has been warped and somehow now been misconstrued even further to include an actual dwarf planet, called Eris, that lives out in the Kuiper Belt. This planet was originally referred to as “Planet X”- another claimed possible bringer of Earth’s destruction. So recap: Eris is real, was once called Planet X, Nibiru is not real…and NONE OF THEM WILL IMPACT THE EARTH.

Although it might be a nice excuse to get out of work, don’t expect a killer planet to crash into Earth and obliterate it anytime soon. Credit: www.londonlovesbusiness.com

Is the Earth’s magnetic field or a polar shift going to kill us all?

Again, no. Scientists know from rocks on the floor of the oceans that the Earth’s magnetic field, which protects us from the harmful energetic particles that come streaming off the Sun, actually reverses fields. Now, generally the field of Earth does shift every 400,000 years and we’re sort of overdue for one. However, when the magnetic field does reverse (referred to as a polar shift), it won’t be instant- at least we don’t think so- and it probably won’t happen for a couple more millennia.

So there you have it, no the world will not end. Yes, scientists are pretty sure- here’s an official website from NASA addressing these issues and concerns in case you’re not convinced. And finally, yes, people on the internet are crazy. So I guess all that’s left to say then is happy new Long Cycle everyone!

Far too long…

Hello all, sorry it’s been so long since my last post, but things have been busy. First off, since this blog is primarily about my attempt to become an astronaut, I want to be sure to update you guys on the major developments as I go through grad school and work towards my PhD.  So at the end of January, I officially passed my comprehensive exams, the first (and biggest) hurdle that one needs to get over in a Physics PhD program. At UNH, the exam is ten hours split over two days and covers five sections of undergraduate-level physics: Electricity & Magnetism, Classical Mechanics, Thermodynamics, Quantum Mechanics, and Modern Physics. Now, you non-physics inclined people are probably gagging at the thought of such an exam right now. Believe me, I like physics and I felt that way about it. But luckily, with a lot of studying and a good amount of luck, I was able to pass and move on in my grad school career. I also made another important step in grad school: picking a research advisor and group to do my research with. I’m going to be working with Dr. Marc Lessard in the Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Research Lab doing sounding rocket observations of Earth’s aurora. Basically, I’m going to get the chance to travel to places even colder than New Hampshire (Alaska and Norway) and launch rockets with scientific instruments through the aurora so we can take measurements of how the atmosphere reacts to the phenomenon. I really excited about the way things have worked out already at UNH. In addition to getting hardware experience building the instruments for the rocket (improving my engineering skill which I feel astronauts generally need), I’m also getting to work with aurora, which is what I focused my undergraduate research on. So yeah, things are looking good.

Now, about the world at large. Two scientists from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette have used numerical models to predict that a planet four-times larger than Jupiter could be living out at the very limits of our solar system in a region known as the Oort Cloud. The Oort Cloud is a spherical shell of cometary bodies believed to surround the sun far beyond the orbit of Pluto. Astrophysicists John Matese and Daniel Whitmire believe that gravity from this proposed planet, dubbed “Tyche”, could explain the odd orbital motions of comets. I’m still a bit skeptical about this research (as are many other astronomers), but Matese and Whitmire are looking for observational proof to confirm the planet’s existence. In a bit of an historical aside, it was numerical inaccuracies in the calculation of Uranus’ orbit in the late 18th century that led to the belief that there were planets beyond it and the eventual discovery of Neptune and Pluto. However, after those planets were discovered, scientists realized that their calculations of Uranus’ orbit had been wrong and the math didn’t say there had to be planets beyond it (the mistake was fortunate for Neptune and Pluto though!)

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A big week…

A lot has gone on for NASA in the past week. Here’s a quick recap:

1) After Comet Hartley 2 finished displaying itself in the the Northeastern sky for the past month or so, the comet was visited by NASA’s EPOXI spacecraft which successfully passed within 435 miles of the comet (the closest approach to a comet ever). You might say, 435 miles, why is that so impressive? Well when you’re in space trying to maneuver your spacecraft next to something moving at 27,000 miles per hour while constantly spraying ice-water crystals out, 435 miles is probably close enough. EPOXI, a 4.7 meter telescope normally used for deep-sky observations got several pretty spectacular images of the peanut-shaped comet.

Comets are icy, rocky bodies which orbit around the Sun in highly elliptical orbits. Many comets become visible from Earth with the naked eye as they approach the Sun in their orbit because the Sun causes their ice to melt and the resulting water vapor becomes highly reflective to sunlight. Hartley 2 was discovered in 1984 by astronomer Malcolm Hartley; it orbits the Sun every six years. Learning more about comets like Hartley might lead to more information about the formation of the Sun and our solar system.

2) The much anticipated final flight of the Space Shuttle Discovery (see previous post: “Up, up, and away…”) was delayed several times this week and ultimately postponed until November 30 due to several complications that arose. Helium and nitrogen leaks in one of the craft’s engine pods, electrical glitches in a backup computer controller in one of the main engines, and bad weather all combined to prove that NASA’s workhorse won’t go silently into retirement. Hopefully all the issues can be resolved and Discovery will be able to make its final flight and return before the end of the year.

3) Tuesday’s mid-term elections may have a bigger impact on NASA than one might have imagined. The Congressional approval of President Obama’s proposed NASA budget (see previous post: Mo’ money, mo’ problems…”) may hit a road block once Republicans take control of the House of Representatives in January. Many Republican candidates ran on platforms that included reduced domestic spending, which means that the proposed $300 million budget increase that was approved for NASA in early October might be in jeopardy. We’ll have to wait to see how this one pans out.

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